Omar Khan

Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Architecture, Situated Technologies Research Group
Co-Director, Center for Architecture and Situated Technologies

omarkhan@buffalo.edu

Associate Professor Omar Khan is an architect, educator and researcher whose work spans the disciplines of architecture, installation/performance art and digital media. His projects and teaching explore the intersection of architecture and pervasive computing for designing responsive architecture and environments. Prof. Khan received his Bachelor of Architecture degree from Cornell University and a Master in Design and Computation from MIT where he was a member of the Aesthetics and Computation Group at the MIT Media Lab. He has exhibited nationally and internationally including the Incheon Digital Art Festival (Korea), Urban Screens Melbourne, ZeroOne San Jose, Storefront for Art and Architecture, the National Building Museum and the Urban Center. He is a fellow of the New York Foundation for the Arts and has received grants from the New York State Council on the Arts and the Department of Education. He is also co-principal with Laura Garófalo of Liminal Projects, an architectural design office.

Mark Shepard

 

Associate Professor, Departments of Architecture and Media Study, Situated Technologies Research Group
Co-Director, Center for Architecture and Situated Technologies
Director, Media Arts and Architecture Program (MAAP)

shepard6@buffalo.edu

Mark Shepard is an artist, architect and researcher whose work investigates contemporary entanglements of technology and urban life. He is co-editor of the Situated Technologies Pamphlets Series and editor of Sentient City: ubiquitous computing, architecture and the future of urban space, published by MIT Press. He curated Toward the Sentient City, an exhibition organized by the Architectural League of New York that critically explored the evolving relationship between ubiquitous computing and the city through a series of commissioned projects distributed throughout New York City. His work has been presented at museums, galleries and festivals internationally, including the 2012 Venice International Architecture Biennial, the 2011 Prix Ars Electronica, Linz, Austria, and the 2009 International Architecture Biennial Rotterdam. His work has been supported by The US Department of Education, The New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA), The Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, Creative Capital, and Eyebeam Art + Technology Center, where he was a 2011-2012 Fellow.

 

 

Jordan Geiger

Assistant Professor, Department of Architecture, Situated Technologies Research Group
Faculty, Center for Architecture and Situated Technologies

jordang@buffalo.edu

Jordan Geiger is an architect and educator whose research and design practice address time-based and temporary constructions, and collaborative, interdisciplinary methods of practice. He directs Ga-Ga, a design studio with projects that cross architecture and interaction design, considering implications of human computer interaction for social and environmental issues. These vary in scale and type from installation and gallery design to urban design and agricultural land use proposals; they are exhibited and published internationally, and Geiger speaks on the work at conferences and symposia. In 2008, he co-organized the “Vapor” exhibition and associated “Vapor Symposium” in San Francisco. These presented architecture, design and art engaged with new technologies to address issues of air pollution and climate change. Geiger is a faculty member of the Center for Architecture and Situated Technologies (CAST) and of the Information and Computing Technologies Strategic Strength of UB2020. Geiger has previously taught architecture, urban design and interdisciplinary studios and seminars at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, at UC Berkeley, and at CCA in San Francisco.

Nicholas Bruscia

Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Architecture, Situated Technologies Research Group
Faculty, Center for Architecture and Situated Technologies

nbruscia@gmail.com

Nicholas Bruscia is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Architecture at the University at Buffalo, where he is also a researcher in the Center for Architecture and Situated Technologies (CAST). His work and research focuses on the computational design-to-fabrication process and the application of performative material parameters at various scales. Recent projects have explored augmenting manual making techniques with physical computing enabling a formal response to the chemical characteristics of cast materials, and the digital workflows associated with the fabrication of large-scale sheet metal assemblies. Nick holds an MArch and MFA from the University at Buffalo’s dual degree program in Media Arts and Architecture (MAAP). His work and efforts have been exhibited internationally, including the University of Texas at Austin (Tex Fab 5 symposium), University of Michigan, Taubman Gallery (Reflexive Architecture Machines), Architectural Association, London (AA | FAB symposium and exhibition), Berlin (Generator X 2.0 workshop), Torino (Piemonte Share Festival), Buffalo (Beyond-In WNY), New York (Center for Architecture and D3 Natural Systems exhibition), and the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (ACADIA 2008: Silicon + Skin).

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This collection, edited by Jordan Geiger, employs the “entr’acte” — a theatre construct of time and space between […]

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This exhibition introduces Jordan Geiger’s design research on the architecture and human-computer interactions of “Very Large Organizations (VLOs).” […]

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Gravity Screens are part of a research project exploring computationally inspired and augmented materials for responsive architecture

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An infrared urban screen for promoting dialogue and interaction between remote publics.

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The Tactical Sound Garden [TSG] is an open source software platform for cultivating public “sound gardens” in contemporary cities.

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Hyperculture is a design platform that operates on the dual role of the Earth as interface.

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A graduate design studio that develops responsive architecture for the NYC subway and addresses environmental health problems.

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Propagative Urbanism is a way of thinking about shaping the architecture of urban space in terms of a bottom-up, participatory approach to the evolution of cities.

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Niagora is a master plan for the built environment surrounding the Peace Bridge at the US-Canada border crossing […]

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An exhibition of student and faculty research work in responsive materials.

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A graduate research studio that explores the atmosphere of the freeway and proposes various responsive architecture that engage its ecology.

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The Sentient City Survival Kit is a design research project that explores the social, cultural and political implications of ubiquitous computing for urban environments.

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Sentient City explores the experience of living in a city that employs networked digital technologies to remember, correlate, and anticipate.

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Investigating how natural and artificial atmospheric systems can serve as models for the design, analysis and interpretation of the architecture of urban environments.

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A variable event structure designed to raise awareness of issues surrounding the wireless topography of urban environments.

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Day For Night was a temporary architectural environment that operated on the street life of downtown San Jose, California […]

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The Situated Technologies Pamphlets series explores the implications of ubiquitous computing for architecture and urbanism.

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This course introduces basic concepts and techniques for creating objects, spaces and media that sense and respond to their physical surroundings.

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An exhibition critically exploring the evolving relationship between ubiquitous computing, architecture and urban space.

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A responsive architecture that adapts to crowds by sensing the changing carbon dioxide in the air.

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It is not just the trust we place in network infrastructure but also our willingness to trade bits […]

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A technic course that introduces students to parametric design and rapid prototyping technologies.

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Discourse

This collection, edited by Jordan Geiger, employs the “entr’acte” — a theatre construct of time and space between […]